palaeopedia:

The chinese beautiful feather, Sinocalliopteryx (2007)
Phylum : ChordataClass : ReptiliaOrder : SaurischiaSuborder : TheropodaFamily : CompsognathidaeGenus : SinocalliopteryxSpecies : S. gigas
Early Cretaceous (124,6 Ma)
2,4 m long and 20 kg (size)
Yixian formation, China (map)
As an example of how big Sinocalliopteryx was, compared to other dino-birds of the early Cretaceous period, a fossilized specimen has been found with the remains of a raptor in its gut—proving that some feathered dinosaurs hunted and ate other feathered dinosaurs. While 7 feet long and 75 pounds may not sound very impressive, in terms of later dinosaurs, these measurements were apparently enough to put Sinocalliopteryx near the top of the Eurasian food chain. (The closest competitor of this dinosaur appears to have been another large dino-bird, Huaxiagnathus.)
Not only was Sinocalliopteryx big, but it sported big feathers, too. The remains of this theropod bear the imprints of tufts as long as four inches, as well as shorter feathers around its feet. And a new study shows that Sinocalliopteryx put its size to good use: an individual has been identified harboring the remains of no less than three fossilized specimens of Confuciusornis, a much smaller dino-bird that may actually have been capable of powered flight.

palaeopedia:

The chinese beautiful feather, Sinocalliopteryx (2007)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Reptilia
Order : Saurischia
Suborder : Theropoda
Family : Compsognathidae
Genus : Sinocalliopteryx
Species : S. gigas

  • Early Cretaceous (124,6 Ma)
  • 2,4 m long and 20 kg (size)
  • Yixian formation, China (map)

As an example of how big Sinocalliopteryx was, compared to other dino-birds of the early Cretaceous period, a fossilized specimen has been found with the remains of a raptor in its gut—proving that some feathered dinosaurs hunted and ate other feathered dinosaurs. While 7 feet long and 75 pounds may not sound very impressive, in terms of later dinosaurs, these measurements were apparently enough to put Sinocalliopteryx near the top of the Eurasian food chain. (The closest competitor of this dinosaur appears to have been another large dino-bird, Huaxiagnathus.)

Not only was Sinocalliopteryx big, but it sported big feathers, too. The remains of this theropod bear the imprints of tufts as long as four inches, as well as shorter feathers around its feet. And a new study shows that Sinocalliopteryx put its size to good use: an individual has been identified harboring the remains of no less than three fossilized specimens of Confuciusornis, a much smaller dino-bird that may actually have been capable of powered flight.

Reblogged from cookiecuttinggoblin

A calling,
sounding back from the gray
clouds and castles and thrones
of Heaven; the Fates
stretching forth their wrinkled,
gnarled, knuckled hands,
and point at the page,
the white bite of a promise.

They say, “this”
with not a spoken syllable—
the kinds of things just known.
And so, it is this
I follow.
This, this pen and papaer
that has doomed and blessed these bones;
a story I write the end to
and will hold in my hands
until they are cold and curled.

Schuyler Peck, Fated to the Page (via schuylerpeck)